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The Truth About Home Remedies for Plantar Warts

by | Mar 9, 2021

If there is one “industry” that will likely persist forever, it’s the constant stream of “home remedies” people claim for a variety of ailments – including plantar warts.

We’ll come right out and say it now: the “miraculous” methods for treating plantar warts at home you have heard about are not scientifically verified. In fact, there’s little evidence that they work. We provide professional, proven treatment for you.

So, why do “home remedies” continue to persist despite lack of evidence? There are several reasons.

Warts Went Away – But Was it the Home Remedy?

Plantar warts are caused by a virus – specifically, certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). The virus invades the upper layers of the skin and creates the rough, grainy, bumpy patches you are likely familiar with.

The virus can thrive for some time, but eventually most cases will resolve on their own. This can take time, though – up to 2 years or longer in some cases.

So how do home remedies play into this?

If one has been trying various home remedies and their plantar warts start to disappear, they may assume that this treatment finally “did the trick.” That only seems natural to believe.

However, correlation does not always equal causation. There is a very good chance that the warts were already starting to fade away on their own, with or without the use of the home remedy. But if someone believes their remedy was responsible (and we are not blaming them for that), they may tell everyone about it, and others may try it until it “works” for them, too.

It’s easy to unintentionally spread misinformation this way.

If there is one “industry” that will likely persist forever, it’s the constant stream of “home remedies” people claim for a variety of ailments – including plantar warts. We’ll come right out and say it now: the “miraculous” methods for treating plantar warts at home you have heard about are not scientifically verified. In fact, there’s little evidence that they work. We provide professional, proven treatment for you. So, why do “home remedies” continue to persist despite lack of evidence? There are several reasons. Warts Went Away – But Was it the Home Remedy? Plantar warts are caused by a virus – specifically, certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV). The virus invades the upper layers of the skin and creates the rough, grainy, bumpy patches you are likely familiar with. The virus can thrive for some time, but eventually most cases will resolve on their own. This can take time, though – up to 2 years or longer in some cases. So how do home remedies play into this? If one has been trying various home remedies and their plantar warts start to disappear, they may assume that this treatment finally “did the trick.” That only seems natural to believe. However, correlation does not always equal causation. There is a very good chance that the warts were already starting to fade away on their own, with or without the use of the home remedy. But if someone believes their remedy was responsible (and we are not blaming them for that), they may tell everyone about it, and others may try it until it “works” for them, too. It’s easy to unintentionally spread misinformation this way.

Do Not Believe Everything You See on the Internet

Seeing a loved one post on Facebook about a plantar wart remedy they believe worked for them is one thing, but there are other players out in social media who are making a business out of getting people to believe things that aren’t true.

There are those willing to play fast and loose with the truth if it means more people will click on their links and videos. One very common way this occurs is through “content farms” churning out video after video of “food hacks,” many of which end up being fake and easily debunked. But the point is not to provide factual information – it’s to draw attention and revenue.

It can be similarly simple and profitable to make “home remedy” videos, especially if there is a product to sell as well. Please exercise caution with what you see online.

You Don’t Have to Be Afraid of Professional Plantar Wart Treatment Anymore

And there is also one very understandable reason why one may try home remedies before pursuing professional treatment: in the past, professional treatments hurt!

Previous plantar wart treatment methods have involved freezing, burning, or surgically excising warts. They are not the most pleasant of experiences and we understand why someone may prefer not to put themself or their child through such a process.

But we have a much better and much more comfortable way of getting rid of warts on the feet – and it has a much more reliable record than home remedies.

Swift Treatment works by using low doses of microwaves to stimulate an immune system response. It focuses on the area where the virus causing the warts resides (which is often overlooked by the immune system because it is so close to the surface of the skin). This allows your immune system to better recognize and attack the virus.

A course of Swift Treatment consists of 2-4 short sessions, with one scheduled each month. The application of the microwave pulse can cause a small amount of discomfort, but the pain fades within milliseconds. 

With Swift, there is no more damage to the skin, no more limping out of the exam room, no more dressings, no more aftercare, and no more pain.

As an added benefit, as we are using your own natural defenses, your immune system will be better equipped to recognize and attack similar viral strains in the future. This can significantly reduce the chances of contracting warts again.

A Better Alternative to Home Remedies

If you still wish to try home remedies for your plantar warts first, we are not here to stop you. All we ask is that you do not try anything that requires damaging your skin or hurting yourself. 

Call Midwest Podiatry Centers at (612) 788-8778 to schedule an appointment with us, or fill out our online contact form if you prefer to reach us electronically instead.